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Elevating Cocktails with Bitters

If you've ever wondered what makes a cocktail truly special, the answer might just be hiding in a tiny bottle of bitters. These small but mighty flavor boosters add depth, color, and aroma to your drinks, and can even be used as a garnish. Learn about the history of bitters, the wide variety of flavors available, and how you can use them to enhance your cocktails.

The Medicinal Origins of Bitters

Bitters weren't always meant for cocktails. Originally, they were created as medicine, believed to have healing properties. Over time, they made their way from the medicine cabinet to the bar, becoming a crucial ingredient in both classic and modern cocktails.

Bitters are crafted through the maceration or infusion of herbs, spices, roots, and other botanicals in high-proof alcohol. This process extracts the complex flavors and aromas, resulting in a concentrated liquid that can be used in small doses to add depth to drinks. 

Types of Bitters

Bitters come in various flavors, each bringing its own unique touch to your drink. The most common type is aromatic bitters, like Angostura or Peychaud's, which blend herbs, spices, and botanicals. There are also fruit-based bitters (think orange or cherry), herbal ones (like lavender or basil), and spicy options (cinnamon or cardamom).

How Bitters Make Cocktails Better

Bitters are the secret sauce that turns a simple cocktail into a sophisticated beverage. Here's how they do it.

Balancing Flavors

Bitters play referee, making sure the sweetness in your drink doesn't take over. Whether it's an Old Fashioned or a Gin Sour, a few drops of bitters can keep things well-balanced.

Aromas and Layers

Aromatics are a crucial component of any culinary art, and mixology is no different. Bitters can capture nuanced, subtle scents that might otherwise be lost in a sea of strong flavors, and provide a first glimpse into the profile of a drink.

Boosting Citrus

If your cocktail has citrusy elements, adding a dash of bitters enhances those zesty notes. This dynamic duo works wonders in classics like the Margarita or Daiquiri.

Personalized Creations

Mixologists get crafty with bitters, using them to create signature drinks. If you want to customize your drinks even further, you can even learn how to make your own bitters.

Garnishes

A few dashes of bitters on top of the signature foam of a Whiskey Sour is a great way to add visual appeal as well as extra flavor. Professional bartenders often create beautiful swirls and patterns on the surface by dragging a cocktail pick through the bitters.

Creative Ways to Use Bitters

Aside from their role in classic drinks, bitters have found their way into creative recipes. Here are some ideas.

Bitter Spritz

Turn a simple spritz into a sophisticated sip by adding a bit of aromatic bitters. It adds a refreshing twist to the fizzy drink and a touch of color.

Bittered Tiki Vibes

Even tropical Tiki drinks can benefit from bitters. Herbal or spiced bitters can give these fruity concoctions an extra layer of flavor.

Bitter-Infused Syrups

Make your syrups more interesting by infusing them with bitters. A cinnamon-orange syrup can take your hot toddies or cold brews to a whole new level.

Smoky Whiskey Magic

If you love whiskey, try adding smoked bitters. It brings a hint of smokiness that pairs perfectly with the richness of the spirit.

Trinidad Sour

Although bitters are usually used in small quantities, some recipes call for much more. The Trinidad Sour is the most famous—it uses a whopping 1 ½ oz. of Angostura bitters.

Bitters might be small, but they play a big role in making your cocktails unforgettable. With a fascinating history, a range of flavors, and the ability to add complexity, bitters are a must-have for any cocktail enthusiast. Build a collection of your favorite flavors and experiment with them to see how they can make a big difference to your home bartending repertoire.

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